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ninja chipmunks united

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( "He was an American; he wanted to be supreme but ordinary, a tycoon and a regular guy, an author and a reader."

- Suspects, by David Thomson )

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03/04/2011 23:17:38


excerpt of Françoise Rosay’s memoirs (translated by me) where she reminisces about meeting Conrad Veidt in Hollywood in the late 20s.At Emil Janning’s, I met very often Conrad Veidt. I still remember him very clearly as he was a great artist. As a human being, he was strange, odd. He gave me a terrible fright, the first day. We were in Jannings’ double living-room as I was looking at the room, I suddenly saw a door surrounded by curtains with a terrifying head that made abominable faces at me. It was the way Conrad Veidt had found to present himself. He drank quite a lot, he rather liked drugs, he mostly loved women, beautiful girls. He was odd, odd, the best of men certainly. He was very much in love with a beautiful girl whom I trained. She was very beautiful but untalented. I’ll say frankly that Conrad also loved men, once in a while. He was extremely kind, but when he had relied too heavily on some substance, he became odd again… Curiously, Gussy Holl, Emil Janning’s wife, had been previously Conrad Veidt’s wife and she loved him a lot. She said he was a bit eccentric, but she admired him and loved him sincerely. Gussy Holl was an intelligent, decided and elegant woman who had been very successful in German cabarets. She sang wonderful songs apparently, but unfortunately I never heard her perform. She also had a daughter from a close relative of the Kaiser. It gave her some kind of aristocratic veneer. Her daughter, who was around 18 at that time, was called ‘Boubie’. Anyway, everybody called her that way. It was a tall girl, pretty large; she looked like a police constable. It was a mistake to call her ‘boubie’, baby…One day, as I was alone with Gussy Holl, I asked her directly-But why did you divorce from Conrad Veidt?-I’ll tell you. I excused a lot of his failings and whims because I loved him. But one day he did something to me that I couldn’t forgive. I was singing that evening at the cabaret. I left him home and he told me: “I invited a few friends; we’ll dine while we wait for you.” And it just so happened I had received a new dress from Paris. That evening, after work, I arrived home and what do I see? All these gentlemen dressed as women. And Conrad had put on my Paris dress. At this point, I divorced!Françoise Rosay: La Traversée d’une vie (ed. Robert Laffont, 1974)
translated by http://annhardingstreasures.blogspot.com/

addition by moirafinnie on the linked film forum:
Recently I read a transcript of an unpublished interview from the period when Veidt was working in America in the ’40s. In it “Connie” describes his propensity for excess in the teens and twenties, which he shrugged off as youthful foolishness, but philosophically hoped he had learned to curb these tendencies in himself, hinting that his tastes were more conservative by then. He was, of course, charming to the interviewer, who I am not sure fully understood his references.

excerpt of Françoise Rosay’s memoirs (translated by me) where she reminisces about meeting Conrad Veidt in Hollywood in the late 20s.

At Emil Janning’s, I met very often Conrad Veidt. I still remember him very clearly as he was a great artist. As a human being, he was strange, odd. He gave me a terrible fright, the first day. We were in Jannings’ double living-room as I was looking at the room, I suddenly saw a door surrounded by curtains with a terrifying head that made abominable faces at me. It was the way Conrad Veidt had found to present himself. He drank quite a lot, he rather liked drugs, he mostly loved women, beautiful girls. He was odd, odd, the best of men certainly. He was very much in love with a beautiful girl whom I trained. She was very beautiful but untalented. I’ll say frankly that Conrad also loved men, once in a while. He was extremely kind, but when he had relied too heavily on some substance, he became odd again… Curiously, Gussy Holl, Emil Janning’s wife, had been previously Conrad Veidt’s wife and she loved him a lot. She said he was a bit eccentric, but she admired him and loved him sincerely. Gussy Holl was an intelligent, decided and elegant woman who had been very successful in German cabarets. She sang wonderful songs apparently, but unfortunately I never heard her perform. She also had a daughter from a close relative of the Kaiser. It gave her some kind of aristocratic veneer. Her daughter, who was around 18 at that time, was called ‘Boubie’. Anyway, everybody called her that way. It was a tall girl, pretty large; she looked like a police constable. It was a mistake to call her ‘boubie’, baby…
One day, as I was alone with Gussy Holl, I asked her directly
-But why did you divorce from Conrad Veidt?
-I’ll tell you. I excused a lot of his failings and whims because I loved him. But one day he did something to me that I couldn’t forgive. I was singing that evening at the cabaret. I left him home and he told me: “I invited a few friends; we’ll dine while we wait for you.” And it just so happened I had received a new dress from Paris. That evening, after work, I arrived home and what do I see? All these gentlemen dressed as women. And Conrad had put on my Paris dress. At this point, I divorced!

Françoise Rosay: La Traversée d’une vie (ed. Robert Laffont, 1974)

translated by http://annhardingstreasures.blogspot.com/

addition by moirafinnie on the linked film forum:

Recently I read a transcript of an unpublished interview from the period when Veidt was working in America in the ’40s. In it “Connie” describes his propensity for excess in the teens and twenties, which he shrugged off as youthful foolishness, but philosophically hoped he had learned to curb these tendencies in himself, hinting that his tastes were more conservative by then. He was, of course, charming to the interviewer, who I am not sure fully understood his references.

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    I don’t believe such garbage! If Viola, his daughter, had seen her father in such a state, she would have been a...
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